Standardized Work for Leaders – Is That a Thing?

Standardized Work for Leaders – Is That a Thing?

by Patrick Adams | May 17, 2022

In this episode, Deb Coviello and I discuss Leader Standard Work and how best leverage this tool as an Executive Leader: even the creative & innovative process needs Leader Standard work; not to thwart the creative process but to ensure you have enough time for it without burnout.  Deb is the founder of Illumination Partners, Author of the book CEO’s Compass – Your Guide to Getting Back on Track  and the host of The Drop In CEO Podcast.

 

What You’ll Learn This Episode:

  • How should Leader Standard Work be used by executive leaders?
  • Where should executive leaders spend their time?
  • The 70/20/10 rule of standard work
  • What should you do when you get busy and cannot stick to your standard work?
  • How should leaders prioritize their decisions?
  • Eisenhower matrix Shiny penny funnel: We see the shiny penny and see possibilities in everything. However, we need to run it through our decision logic funnel to prioritize Accountability partners

 

About the Guest: 

Deb Coviello is the Founder of Illumination Partners and the host of The Drop In CEO podcast. For more than twenty years, she has been transforming businesses from within, elevating the talents of their organizations to new performance levels. Her experience has taught her to put tremendous value on people, whom she considers as the heart of every business.

As The Drop In CEO Deb provides her clients with 25+ years worth of experience and strategy in Quality and Operational Excellence roles combined with her 20 years in the Flavors and Fragrance industry, to identify, assess, and solve the issues that are preventing their business growth. Certified as Lean and Six Sigma Blackbelt in Process Improvement, she has also developed significant leadership insight that “People’’ are your greatest tool in your toolbox. In order to deliver on her promise of offering “peace of mind,” she focuses on utilizing the talents of her client’s team and elevating them to new levels of performance, setting them up to better serve their organization.

When she isn’t transforming businesses from within, Deb is a board member of Women in Flavor & Fragrance Commerce, (WFFC), an avid Curler with the Cincinnati Curling Club, a mother of 3 and resides in Cincinnati Ohio with her Husband Dan of 32 years.

 

Important Links:

Email: [email protected]

Website: https://dropinceo.com

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/deborahacoviello/

Drop in CEO Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-drop-in-ceo/id1498953914?ls=1

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/IlluminationPartnersLLC/

Twitter: @DropinCEO

Instagram: @dropinceo

Full Episode Transcripts: 

 

Patrick Adams 

Welcome to the Lean solutions podcast where we discuss business solutions to help listeners develop and implement action plans for true Lean process improvement. I am your host, Patrick Adams. Hello, and welcome to the Lean solutions podcast. With us today is Deb Coviello. This is her second time back on the show. She was with us back in episode 45. And she is the author of the CEOs compass your guide to getting back on track. She is also the host of the drop in CEO podcast over 25 years in quality and operational excellence roles. Deb has a deep understanding for what’s important when it comes to creating solutions for executive and C suite leaders by assessing the landscape solving their technical business issues, and evaluating their people for lasting impact and ultimately, for peace of mind. She is here today to help share a bit of how the CEOs compass can help bring all of us peace of mind. Welcome to the show.

 

Deb Coviello 

Oh, Patrick, my pleasure. And I’m so excited to be able to have a conversation and hopefully provide some insights for your listeners. So thank you so much, this will be amazing.

 

Patrick Adams 

You bet. So today we are going to be talking specifically to executive and C suite leaders around how Leader Standard Work could be applied in their roles. But I also want to say that, you know, for anyone that’s listening in any role that the conversation today is definitely going to be relevant. Because everyone should have some level of Leader Standard Work and be using it in the roles for executive and C suite leaders. Of course, their day is probably going to be less structured. And I’m sure we’ll talk about that than someone that’s maybe a team leader or a mid manager. But there are specifics around what executive leaders and C suite leaders should be doing when it comes to Leader Standard Work. So I’m excited to dive into this. And you know, I’ll just start dead by turning over to you. Can you tell us a little bit about what you call leader stat, what your Leader Standard Work is or executive? I believe you call it entrepreneurial standard work of some sort. Can you just tell us a little bit about how you define it?

 

Deb Coviello 

Yeah, so thank you again for that. And when I talk about entrepreneurial standard work, I really talk about that which is within our domain, each one of us if we think about it, whether we are a subject matter expert, technical leader, or we are a mid career, middle manager, or navy, we are that C suite leader, we are each an entrepreneur, we do have somewhat control over the work we do. And to your point in the Lean world, depending on where you are at in that hierarchy, you may or may not have different percentages. But I want everybody to think of a mindset that you are an entrepreneur, you are a CEO, because it is a mindset, it is a mindset that you come to work every day with an open mind, you assess the landscape in front of you, then you have to align your work against the strategy and the tactical work, as well as then the discipline to be able to execute it and get everything done and not have burnout. So it is a mindset that every one of you can start exercising these principles that will hopefully we’re going to talk about, you are the CEO of your own destiny, you are all senior leaders within your own domain. And you do have control over the work you do in order to achieve your highest potential.

 

Patrick Adams 

I love that. And that’s a great mindset that that all of us should hold, really. So I appreciate that you that you made that point when when it comes to leaders and how they spend their time, what would be your recommendation around breakdown for you know, where leaders should be spending the majority of their time.

 

Deb Coviello 

So that’s an interesting topic. And I sometimes go against the grain there philosophically, and there’s been some books written on them, and I’m sure they’re on my shelf right now. But they often say that spending time, more like 70% around building the strategy 20% of your time should be executing strategy. And 10% of the time should be reflection and course correction. And I know a lot in the Lean world is around, reflecting retrospective work could be in the Agile world as well. We as need leaders need to parse out time for which we need to reflect on what we do. Now. You may say, as a middle leader, perhaps my work is laid out for me when those emails come in those meetings come in, we know that that is the tactical work, you might be at a rate of maybe 50% of your time, it’s just executing the day to day. It’s the essence it’s the message here that all of us should set aside time to reflect and think about what are we doing not just the tactical work, but what are those things that one are going to develop yourself? What are you going to do differently that day or try something new, reach out to that person maybe have a one on one? What can you personally do to either strategically They move yourself forward in your capability, or that project that your boss or other people like depending you on, what discipline Do you have that you can at least take one action on that versus potentially executing 80 to 90% of your time. And then at the end of the day, you fall victim to what you didn’t get done. When you spend that 10% and reflect and say, I didn’t get what I really needed to get done today, there’s a bit of discipline, there is decision logic, there are tools to help you. But 7020 10 strategy, execution, reflection, it may fluctuate, but generally think like that, that is the way a senior leader does execute, and you can potentially start managing your day to day that way.

 

Patrick Adams 

Okay. And and, and I love that I love the 7020 10 rule that makes makes a lot of sense. For for those that are listening, I know you said there are some tools and techniques around that for those that are listening that go, Well, you know, my bit, my day is just so busy. And I get so much thrown at me throughout the day. And I ended up at the end of my day looking back and going What did they even get done today? Right? I mean, would you recommend, like time blocking? Would you recommend it, you know, an actual printed sheet that, you know, we’re carrying with us? I mean, what would be your idea around how to make sure that we’re sticking to that 7020 10 rule, even when all of us are bombarded with all different things throughout the day.

 

Deb Coviello 

So to your point, and thank you for bringing up time blocking, I know it’s hard, often the business may dictate your time blocks. It is up to you as a future leader to figure out what time during the day you can parse out. Now I know, when I re entered the workforce after my third child, I was a quality supervisor, I’d already been a quality director. But I became a quality supervisor and Oh my My day was dictated to me. And by the time I got back to my desk at four, I said oh my however, you need to find that time, whether it’s getting early, 30 minutes early, look at your calendar plan at what you’re going to do, what are the top five things you have to get done above and beyond the day to day, and it is a win? If you get one of the five, don’t beat yourself up if you didn’t get all five. But if you can at least spend the time, time block? What are the things that I need to get done today, in addition to whatever happens, if you can just get one done, you are one step further in what you have to achieve. Now, there are some additional things. There’s some decision logic. I’m sure Patrick, you’ve had people talk about this. There is certainly what is important, and what is urgent, I can talk about that. But I also have another way of looking at what you do in terms of making decision because at the end of the day, not everything needs to get done. Everybody will say it needs to get done. But you need to have the tools for better decision logic. So either what’s important or urgent. Or I could also talk about needs, wants and your values often in the area of personal decisions on what you work. So where do you want to go because you definitely have to have decision logic and be able to prioritize the work in order to get things done and move forward.

 

Patrick Adams 

Hey, Patrick, here, I hope you’re enjoying this episode of the lien solutions podcast. And I always hate to interrupt the show. But I wanted to take a moment to let you know about our lien Solutions Academy. We offer many flexible learning and training options to include elearning courses, live virtual classroom and onsite classrooms. Our newest courses include Leader Standard Work and visual management, check out all of our offerings on our website at finding solutions.com and click on Academy. Now back to the show. And I love that that you throughout those different you know if you can, if you can kind of tag your or identify those different actions or activities or tasks throughout your day, you know, as needs or wants. It’s it seems like that that you know, I know for me personally when I for my Leader Standard Work, there are always certain things during my day that either to your earlier point, either I dictated for me like this is a meeting that I have to attend, there’s no question I will be at this meeting. Or there’s certain things where it’s like this is a task that I want to complete at some point during the day. It doesn’t have to be at 8am. It doesn’t have to be at 2pm. But sometime during the day, I’d like to complete it. It’s a lower on my poor priority list. And again, sometimes, you know, to your to your point, I have to give myself grace because I get to the end of my day and I’m like I really just never got to it. I didn’t have time for it. So I’m actually going to shift that task to tomorrow, or the next day or whatever it might be. But do you have any recommendations for people when they do get busy and can’t stick to their standard work? I mean, what level of accountability or flexibility should leaders give to themselves when it comes to their Leader Standard Work?

 

Deb Coviello 

Well, again, we’ve talked to about having grace we do need to change with the changing conditions. I often will suggest to people just take some time to look at all the work that comes your way and reflect on what’s important and reflect on when you do it and then reevaluate. I mean, if you are constantly dealing with the day to day evaluate what’s important, what can be delayed? What do you not have to do anymore? If you send a report out every day and nobody’s looking at it, see if you can take that off your list of to do’s it may be 10 or 30 minutes a day. And nobody’s using it, ask the question, be the leader that you want others to be and ask what value is this, or maybe group meetings, find ways to consolidate, maybe have a one on one. But you also need to do a strategy session, be smart about your time, see where you can combine things do things in parallel, or simply not doing anything, I think when we validate who we are, by the amount of activity, we lose ourselves in the process, if you continue to go back to your strategy, I’m going to spend some time taking that online course, I’m going to spend some time developing the people around me. And then et cetera. If you can’t stick to that, you have to find ways to stick to that and keep getting better at it every week. So find the measurement system be give yourself flexibility if things don’t have work, because I will tell you, I am off track, I was supposed to launch a particular initiative in April. And now I’m doing it in August. I don’t think that was a failure. Things happen that I realized who I wasn’t doing things efficiently, I wasn’t doing enough business development. So I actually have to increase my activity in one area, decrease networking, I love networking, but it’s not serving me in order to then achieve that goal that I set for me, myself now in August. So again, it’s a constant loop of reflection, reevaluating, and changing how you function. It’s an evolution, but by the time you’re done with six months into a year of doing this, your ways of working will absolutely be different. And you’ll be thanking yourself for doing it.

 

Patrick Adams 

So true. One, one task or activity that I’d like to talk about maybe a little bit here is the task or activity of checking email, I only bring this up because I just had this conversation the other day with with a leader at an organization. And he said, You know, I feel like I spend all day on email, he’s like, you know, I opened up my email on my cell phone, and then I, you know, I see an email or two that I have to, I feel like I have to respond to and so now then I ended up down this spiral of, of work, you know, off on these different tangents and down these different rabbit holes, trying to take care of things that came to my email. And then I look back at my day, you know, at by the end of the day, I look back at my day, and you know, those items that I had listed as priorities on my Leader Standard Work, I’m not able to get to because I spent all my time on email. Do you have any recommendations for leaders that maybe find themselves in that same position where they’re just, they’re getting stuck, you know, in this black hole of responding to emails, because emails are important. I mean, we, need to respond to emails, but you know, how much time is invested in that? Do you have anything for leaders around that?

 

Deb Coviello 

Perhaps thank you for that question. It has always been a challenge, it is probably a reason why I have failed in one previous leadership role, because I was so caught up in the instance satisfaction and lack of discipline. And I sorry to say that our society is based on that. And because of that, I did not get to some of the strategic work. So please, please, please don’t let that happen to you. And you’re probably feeling the stress and then overwhelmed, working extra hours and then being down on yourself. A quick tip that I do is I will always scan all my email, I never leave anything unread. I have trained people that work for me that if it’s urgent, train people that need you how to qualify things in the subject line, please respond, please advise answers needed. Meeting on this date, train people around you that are important to you, when it’s important or qualified, low priority when you have a time. So you do have to discipline others. However, absolutely scan your emails in the morning sets your day for any course corrections, you may scan other emails, mark them as important or delete. You don’t have to respond to everything, acknowledge it and say, Can I catch up with that on a Friday afternoon, or these are the things I need to get done at the end today? I would generally say I action on my emails in the morning, scan for information and course corrections during the day, and it will action on them. At the end of the day. It’s hard. But if you’re not disciplined in it, how can you expect the people in your care to be disciplined? So think about it, try it. Be diligent, have the courage to try something different, you might actually find that you have more time in your day to do the work you need to do.

 

Patrick Adams 

That’s right. That’s right. Absolutely. So just I appreciate that. I want to talk about decision making and maybe even prioritizing decisions. How do you How would you recommend leaders should prioritize their decisions? Are there any tools out there that you think would be helpful in helping leaders you know, prioritize

 

Deb Coviello 

Yeah, I mean, there’s a number of them there. It’s not rocket science, I think the hard part is for a leader to actually say I’m going to start doing it, and then sticking to it. That’s the hard part. So I want people to listen to that. Again, love my lean training and on signals, if anything is urgent, it becomes red. If it’s caution, I need to get to it not too long, I make it yellow. And obviously, if I am so far behind red does resonate. And you have to work on it. But green, you know, I just let things go use the and Don’s use post it notes. But what I would say is, obviously, I use the Eisenhower matrix, always, if it’s important and urgent do now because if it’s, if you don’t do it, it’s going to be a crisis for yourself, if it’s important, but not so urgent, certainly to lay it, reschedule it. If it’s not important for your to do or urgent you can delegate to somebody else. But if it’s not important, and not urgent, it’s a newsletter, unsubscribe, delete, don’t respond. Your value is not defined by all those emails. But there are other things for leader if I may continue. Another decision making process in terms of needs, wants and your values. I often say if you can check the box on two out of three of these things, it’s the right thing to do. But if you can only check one out of three, it’s probably not important. When it comes to needs, is it something that you need to do as part of your job need to do as part of your career? That’s what needs are. So if you can say yes, I need to do that. Keep that as a priority. Once I want to do this, I want to expand in that area, I want to explore new opportunities. If that’s something you want, you can check it. And if you can check the box and two of those things, yes, it’s important to you. But I will qualify one more thing as your values. If it’s something that violates your values, it’s time not well spent, it’s work that doesn’t serve your needs, it’s disciplinary work, it’s doing things that are not going to Expand your horizon or the business around it violates your values, as non value added. That can be another decision making tool. Now you can check the box sometimes, on all of these things, it may be a new job, a new opportunity, new work a new project, if it serves the needs of the business, and for you check it and if it’s valuable to you. But if you don’t want to do this work, you can do it for a short amount of time. But just know if you only have two out of three, it’s not sustainable. So you can also use that for personal and career distance decision making in terms of prioritizing what you should go after and why you should not sure, sure.

 

Patrick Adams 

And earlier, you talked about the tactical some of the tactical activities, you know, and I think about, you know, some of those things and how those might fit into the priority matrix. Because obviously, you like the 7020 10 rule, there’s definitely strategy that that needs to be spent. Time spent. But I think about also leaders blocking time to support their downline or to support their management team. And I think about like, different ways that they can do that. And what that would look like, you know, one of the things that comes to mind is being involved in a layered audit process, right inspecting what you expect if you have certain expectations for your team, being sure that you’re part of the inspection process of that the auditing process. So that’s just one thing that comes to mind. Do you have any other thoughts for leaders around what types of activities they could be doing and building into their Leader Standard Work? That would be more on the tactical or the execution side?

 

Deb Coviello 

Yeah, thank you. And I appreciate you bringing that up. Sometimes we talk about those audits, the gamba walks as a leadership team or with your team. That is a great way one to learn new things and also have qualify or verify the effectiveness of the things that have been happening in the direction, et cetera. So that’s a great tool as well. I used to when I was not operating as a good standard leader. Having meetings all the time. And all over the place. I actually started creating templates of Leader Standard Work for staff meetings, Leader Standard Work for having one on ones with my employees, and consolidating things. Every email that I would get from an employee, I would act upon call a meeting, go see them right away, and I realized that was disruptive to both of us. So then I would evaluate whether it was a topic relevant to a staff meeting, I would say this is a great thing. Would you mind if we relegate this to the staff meeting and start teeing up the agenda for everybody to learn versus responding, copy everybody and disrupting the world. Same thing with items that are important for an employee, perhaps during a weekly or monthly one on one if it’s an important topic, but can be wait until the one on one then you start queuing up the topics so that when you’re there for the one on one, it is a full agenda And they get everything out of the way. All their answers done, personalize without all the email going back and forth. So look at your email, acknowledge people, and then queue them up in the areas where they can, you can get the most value and just focus on resolving issues or answering questions, stop responding to every single email, put the interaction and discipline in the right place, you will find that your time is better spent.

 

Patrick Adams 

I love that. I love that. That’s great. And you mentioned one on ones, how important are one on ones for executive leaders, or for any leader for that?

 

Deb Coviello 

Oh, my God, it’s everything. And I do talk a lot about this in the book, the CEOs comp is the one on one at the frequency necessary, whether weekly or monthly is so important. Again, it’s just human connection. However you do it zoom call face to face, what have you please stick to those. But the how we do them, I also talked about is really important, because leaders need to also spend 7020 10, on one, personal development, leadership development, whatever it is, then 20% on the strategic work your projects and then 10% in the tactical Hey, what about that report? What do you need right now, because performance of the organization is dependent on the capability and capacity of the individuals, they’ve got the technical expertise. But when I talk about organizational performance in the CEOs, compass, it’s not sales, it’s not EBITA, it’s not that we think that is those are results, we try to close the gaps and the people’s performance, their confidence, all of that. So I asked that if your boss is not doing this, reframe the conversation, set up the Leader Standard Work for your one on ones, talk about people development, feedback, etc. So you have the tools to be successful, then talk about moving the strategy, the project work going forward, and then talk about the tactical so often we as leaders, go to the tactical, and we go to the projects, and there’s never any time for the personal and leadership development. That is a better way of working with your people. And you’re going to get a lot more impact in the long term.

 

Patrick Adams 

Absolutely. And not only discussing how you can, how your how your team can have personal development, but even understanding and blocking time for your own personal development as a leader, right?

 

Deb Coviello 

Yes. It’s a challenge. I mean, even now, even now, I’ve been a senior leader in an organization, I got my six sigma, Lean Six Sigma, Black Belt, lean black belt, but I’m ever evolving myself. And upon reflection, I also realized as a business owner, I needed some coaching and developing on getting the pieces to run on all engines. I was doing everything business development, my operations, my processes, my marketing, something wasn’t working. So I realized I needed to do something different. And I’m now starting to see things gel. So we too, need to pause and seek what do we need to continually develop ourselves and then ask for help to develop that?

 

Patrick Adams 

That’s right. And there’s a ton of great books, podcasts. I mean, there’s so many you YouTube, I mean, the, there’s so many great ways that you can that you can develop your own personal skills. So definitely, there’s not an excuse, I guess, is what I’m saying. But what I want to talk about is accountability, because we’ve talked a lot about, we’ve given a lot of different ideas about how leaders can be more effective with their time. But in the beginning, we also talked about the fact that it does come down to accountability and holding yourself accountable and being diligent to and disciplined. Right. So what are some strategies to keep yourself accountable.

 

Deb Coviello 

So this has been a learning opportunity for me over the years because we set good intentions and then fail to execute. Because yes, we do have to discipline ourselves. But sometimes we need that person on our shoulder kind of whispering in your ear and saying, We didn’t agree to that. This is what we agreed to. So first of all, there’s the discipline yourself, the accountability yourself, set up the tools, the spreadsheets, the post, it notes, whatever you need to try to stay on track. I find a partner, a person that you just talked to that loves to listen to what you say, but when they say Hey, Deb, but I thought you said this last week, this is what you’re going to do now you’re doing that. Oh, yeah. So externally verbalizing what you do. They actually be those gentle reminders when you’re careful partner that cares about you reminds you of what you said you were going to do. But also accountability partners can come from anywhere, your staff, you share a strategy, and everybody understands the strategy you’re executing. You have your staff meeting, you say, Hey, guys, we got this new initiative that just came down from corporate. We need to go like gangbusters on it but then because you articulated the strategy that you had intended on doing your people can say hey, well okay, then where does this fit into it? I’ve spending 50 Mark percent of my time on this now you need to add this new initiative. What When do you want me to do your people? If you continue to communicate what’s happening, what’s changing, they can also help you accountable because now they’ve asked, well placed questions. And then you might say, Oh, you’re right, I forgot about that. I need more resources, or I need to delay. Your people can be accountable accountability partners, and make it visual. So everybody sees, and we talk about that and lean. So you never know where they may come from yourself. A close person in your life, or your team can be your accountability partners.

 

Patrick Adams 

Yeah. So let’s talk a little bit more about that. So, I mean, can could anybody be an accountability partner can? Are there specific, is there’s specific characteristics that we should look for in someone, when we’re when we’re trying to identify a good accountability partner? Also, you know, should that accountability partner have some kind of agenda that they that they have? Do we meet with them on a weekly basis? I mean, what what does that look like, help us to picture what that might look like.

 

Deb Coviello 

So it’s different for everybody. But I have some people, you could hire a coach, you could seek a mentor, you could get a mentor from your professional organization and set the drumbeat and discipline to meet with them regularly, set your goals, and then somebody that’s going to check you against your goals. It could be if you’re a senior leader, and maybe you’re the CEO, or maybe you’re the vice president of operations, and you’ve got a finance person that you regularly meet on running the business, they could be your your accountability partner, but also I might suggest, the person in the room that’s the naysayer, the person in the room, that’s the disrupter. The person that’s noisy. You even though maybe they make you feel uncomfortable, sometimes they are also the person that maybe should say, Hey, can we grab a cup of coffee, I’m struggling right now I’m having some challenges, they may to say to you, things that you don’t want to hear in black and white, but they are the kind of person that jolts you a little bit because they might say something a little crass off color, or remind you, you’re the leader that you need to do. And if you don’t stick to it, bad things happen. So you also need that kind of person that’s abrasive or is going to tell you exactly the way it is

 

Patrick Adams 

sure. Well, and that and that is going to take you know, for some leaders, they’re going to have to humble themselves, they’re gonna have to be coachable. Right, so that and that’s probably not easy for some of the you know, C suite or executive leaders who are used to kind of being the decision maker and the one who’s telling others, or coaching others. Now, you’re going to be the one that’s being coached. And you’re the one that’s going to have to listen to, you know, someone that might challenge you a little bit and push back on you have you had that experience with some of the C suite or executive leaders that you’ve worked with?

 

Deb Coviello 

Well, let’s just say I’m my own client, I didn’t ask for help, I, perhaps I created a bit of a crisis in a particular role, because it was challenging, it was a quality issue. And I said, I can do it myself. And I worked hard, and we rallied the troops. And ultimately, we got things contained and under control. And I did ask for help later. And one of the things that leaders have to do and now it’s one of the things I’d like to talk about is the new business model does not expect you to know everything you know enough to know or should know, when there’s a crisis, or when things are not going in the direction. A new superpower these days is the courage to ask for help. Know what you know, surround yourself with talent, a lot of subject matter experts. But sometimes you exceed the capability and capacity of the people around you. That’s your job to recognize that and then how to fill that capacity or capability. It sometimes comes from within, or it sometimes comes from without that is leadership. And nobody’s going to think anything differently at you that has gone by seek help, before it’s too late. And you get into crisis.

 

Patrick Adams 

Yeah, it just made me think of the I don’t know who this quote came from. But it says something to the effect of if you’re the smartest person in the room, then there’s a problem. Like you want to surround yourself

 

Deb Coviello 

around, you’re not in the right room anymore.

 

Patrick Adams 

You want to surround yourself with people that are subject matter experts that probably know more than you about different things, as an Executive leader by doing that, you elevate your own knowledge and skill set, you know, so I appreciate that. You that, that you that you mentioned that. So thank you. Deb, talk to us about some of the things that you have coming up. We’ve, you know, we know about your book, the CEOs compass. I also know that you do a lot of other things like different extended long term experiences and things. What are some of the things that you have coming up that maybe some of the listeners could tap into or should know about?

 

Deb Coviello 

Well, I certainly appreciate the opera To share more a little bit more about myself, there are two worlds that I work in. But both are around serving the CEO or the C suite leader of today and tomorrow. So if you are a senior leader of today, my website talks about fractional leadership I can partner with you drop in, help you solve a business issue, elevate the capability of your people, as well as crisis management. And again, I talk about crisis management, how to mitigate crisis, but that’s something I can also partner with you. But the work that I love to do is in pursuit of elevating the C suite leaders of tomorrow, I care about you because I was one of those people that struggle. So in addition to the drop and CEO podcast, the book, the CEOs, compass, I also offer one on one coaching services. But I’m particularly proud of the drop in C suite Academy, I do have a cohort opening up in August 2020, to another one in a series that I’ve had, it’s a 12 week experience instructor led training, that is the best way to consume and process training and understanding as well as one on one coaching and many other resources and guest speakers, I’m excited to share that opportunity for those that truly don’t have a support system where they’re at, I’m here to help you struggle less and get the career goals that you want. So drop and C suite Academy would love to share that more for anybody that’s interested.

 

Patrick Adams 

And Bev, if you want to share the link with me, I’ll put it in the show notes. So for anyone that’s listening, they can go right to the show notes and find that the link to the website where you can learn more information about the academy and also reach out to Deb and get it get a hold of her using the contact information that’s there as well. And, Deb, we I mentioned earlier that you were in on an earlier episode, Episode 45, where we talked about high performing leaders and we dove into your book, the CEOs compass. But can you tell us just briefly a little bit about your book and in how leaders can use it to impact their own teams or themselves from a personal development perspective?

 

Deb Coviello 

Well, thank you. And you know, the CEOs compass was written for the person that is orally highly successful and talented. You’ve been in organizations teams, where you’ve gotten amazing results. But what happens is, you get off track, the leadership changes, the direction of the company changes, something changes for all of a sudden, you’re caught off guard, and you’re not sure what went wrong. And what I found is that while there are eight compass points, the top one being peace of mind, which is a state of being that when everything is working on all cylinders around the other compass points, you see and feel peace of mind. And it’s very different than just getting business results. But this compass is for you to look at your own leadership style, we talk about leadership, you might have to change how you’ve led, but depending on your situation, you may pick purpose, performance paths, pride, people process and platforms. One of those things may be to that if you fix those based on some of the things that I have made mistakes on or I’ve seen others work well, you can actually start getting yourself back on track. The one key thing I want to point out is that leaders think they are trying to get results when instead it’s performance in order to get peace of mind. Don’t worry about the business results there was a lagging indicators it is bridging the gap and people’s performance capability and capacity you close those gaps they will perform and you’re going to see and feel peace of mind. Yeah, thank you it love it. Great book.

 

Patrick Adams 

Yes, absolutely. Deb it’s been great to have you back again I’m looking forward to having you know back another day maybe we can dive into one of those other areas around the compass but it’s been great to have you this is the second time on the lien solutions podcast. Thank you again for being here today and talking to our listeners today about Leader Standard Work and how that can help us to you know, really get back some of our own time.

 

Deb Coviello 

My pleasure. Thank you so much.

 

Patrick Adams 

Thanks so much for tuning into this episode of the lien solutions podcast. If you haven’t done so already, please be sure to subscribe. This way you’ll get updates as new episodes become available. If you feel so inclined. Please give us a review. Thank you so much.

Meet Patrick

Patrick is an internationally recognized leadership coach, consultant, and professional speaker, best known for his unique human approach to sound team-building practices; creating consensus and enabling empowerment. He founded his consulting practice in 2018 to work with leaders at all levels and organizations of all sizes to achieve higher levels of performance. He motivates, inspires, and drives the right results at all points in business processes.

Patrick has been delivering bottom-line results through specialized process improvement solutions for over 20 years. He’s worked with all types of businesses from private, non-profit, government, and manufacturing ranging from small business to billion-dollar corporations.

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