Throwback With Paul Akers on Simple Lean

Throwback With Paul Akers on Simple Lean

by Patrick Adams | Jul 5, 2022

Due to my travel schedule this week, I wanted to share a throwback to a conversation I had with Paul Akers this past year. Paul is an author, entrepreneur and the founder and president of FastCap, a product development company specializing in woodworking tools and hardware for the professional builder.

In this episode, Paul and I go over how Lean can be applied to improve your work environment and why you need to focus on small consistent changes when trying to make improvements.
What You’ll Learn This Episode:

  • How Lean helped Paul in Ironman
  • FastCap and the inspiration behind the company
  • The importance of listening to customers
  • Making time to fix what’s bothering you
  • 2 second improvement and why it’s simple
  • The inspiration behind Paul’s videos
  • What it takes to be a good leader in an organization with Lean culture
  • Paul’s advice for someone just starting on their Lean journey

About the Guest: 

Paul Akers is the founder and president of FastCap, a product development company specializing in woodworking tools and hardware for the professional builder. FastCap was started in Paul’s garage in 1997 when he simply “fixed what bugged him” and developed his first product: the Fastcap Cover Cap. From humble beginnings, and no MBA, FastCap has thousands of distributors worldwide in over 40 countries. Paul’s intense curiosity on how things could be improved paved the way for him to become a prolific innovator and today he holds many US and International patents. FastCap launches approximately 20-30 innovative products per year and has won business of the year in 1999 and 2010. In June 2011 Paul won Seattle Business Magazine’s prestigious Business Executive of the Year award. He wrote his first book, 2 Second Lean, about creating a fun, Lean culture, that is now available in 15 languages. In 2015, he wrote his 2nd book, Lean Health, in 2016, he wrote Lean Travel and in 2019, he wrote Lean Life and Banish Sloppiness. In 2016, Paul’s book, 2 Second Lean, was recognized by the Shingo Institute and won the Research and Professional Publication Award.

Important Links:

https://paulakers.net/books/2-second-lean

https://paulakers.net/

https://apps.apple.com/us/app/2-second-lean-play/id1503694993

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.leanplay

Full Episode Transcripts: 

 

Patrick Adams  

Welcome to the Lean solutions podcast where we discuss business solutions to help listeners develop and implement action plans for true Lean process improvement. I am your host, Patrick Adams. Hello, everybody. Our guest today is Paul Akers. Paul is an entrepreneur, the founder and president of FastCap, author of five books. He’s also an international speaker and my favorite title for you, Paul, is that you’re a lean Maniac. Welcome to the show.

Paul Akers  

The bad trick that best describes me

Patrick Adams  

Yeah, so I’m actually it’s pretty cool to see what’s behind you on your screen for those that are listening in and not watching the video. Here. We see an ocean picture behind Paul which looks like some wave surfing or some kite surfing. Right.

Paul Akers  

Exactly. Exactly. Midday and Aspen, you know, cuz I’m in Mexico. Yeah, that’s exactly what my new passion is, kite surfing. Oh, I love getting out there and feeling nature at its finest environment, if you will.

Patrick Adams  

And but before we hit record, we were just chatting a little bit about kitesurfing. And you were saying that it’s actually a bit dangerous. If you don’t know what you’re doing. Is that correct?

Paul Akers  

Yeah, yeah, it’s very, very dangerous. The kite is so powerful, it can pull you out of the water, 30 feet up in the air and then take you, you know, 100 yards, any which direction in a second. So if there’s a tree or an obstacle, or anything, you can hit a rock, it can be very, it can be deadly. So you have to have, you have to absolutely know what’s going on, good processes are a great example of lean, you have to have very good processes, extremely good training. So you can anticipate potential disasters and take the appropriate action.

Patrick Adams  

Wow, my son loves skimboarding. And so he would just love to learn a little bit more about kitesurfing, because he just has a blast anytime around the beach. He’s got to have a skimboard out and he’s just loving you know, just running along the beach and doing his spin moves and different things like that. You know, I don’t know. Can you do that type of stuff with kite surfers? Oh, yeah, you

Paul Akers  

can fly in the air, spin around, flip upside down. It’s gymnastics on steroids.

Patrick Adams  

And I’m sure I’m sure you have to be pretty physically fit in order to do that. And one of the the questions that I had for you today actually was just about your past achievements in Ironman and just, you know, being able to complete I believe to you a two time Ironman, is that correct? Wow. So that’s obviously amazing. How much you mentioned, lean just a little bit there around kitesurfing, how much of your lean learning you know your background in just understanding lean concepts. You know, have you applied to becoming a two time Ironman,

Paul Akers  

Personally, I don’t think I’d be an Ironman if I didn’t know lean and apply lean concepts. Because when I got involved in training for an Ironman, it took me 18 months. And the regiment or the program that they most people prescribed for doing it is hours and hours and hours a day. And I don’t have hours and hours a day because I’m a businessman, I travel, I’ve got family, I’ve got a lot of obligations. So I had to figure out how I could pull this off in 18 months, an hour a day by you know, just taking everything and reducing it down to the bare minimum, if you will, even though an hour a day is a bare minimum to be able to compete at that level. And I was able to do it and it worked very well.

Patrick Adams  

Wow. That’s amazing. Obviously not everybody can hold that title. So definitely kudos to you hats off. I’m, I’ve done some, you know, 10k races, 25k races. I actually did one triathlon a way back and the training for that alone was just incredible. It was incredible. I still run consistently for me, biking and swimming just wasn’t a big interest to me, but I love to run. I mean, I run two, three times a week minimum and just absolutely love it. So definitely understand the work that you put into achieving that. I’ll tell

Paul Akers  

you have a great story. Patrick, if you like to run you’ll love this one. Yeah, so my first Ironman, I swam over two miles in the water, got out, rode a bike 112 Miles right and right when I was at the end of the bike ride, the guy yelled at me. Ah, awesome. Now you only have to run a marathon. And I thought, just think about that. Now you’ve been going for like six hours. And now you only have to run a marathon. I’ll never forget those words for the rest of my life. I’d like God to help me.

Patrick Adams  

That’s no joke. It is definitely a lot of work but love love the fact that you do that and I know you even wrote one of your books around, you know the healthy part of what it takes to do something like that. And so, you know, again, if anybody’s interested, I was looking for the title of that one. It’s lean, healthy, lean health, I was gonna say healthy, healthy, lean, but lean health. So definitely look into that. But you mentioned you as a business owner, a traveler, you You are the the founder and the president of FastCap, which is a development company. And we’ve actually purchased some of your products. I love watching your videos that are out there around FastCap. But you have distribution in over 40 countries. Can you tell us a little bit more about what you guys do at FastCap, and maybe even the inspiration behind starting the company?

Paul Akers  

Yeah, it’s really simple. I’m a cabinet maker. I’m really a really, really simple guy. And I love woodworking. I’m passionate about it. One night, at my shop, it was eight o’clock at night, I was about ready to deliver a job. The next morning, I had to finish something. And what I had to finish was covering the screw holes inside of all the cabinets, I didn’t like to show up on the job site, my customer saw all the screws that were holding finished in panels on toe kicks, and everything else. So I meticulously went through and kept them all, which took me 45 minutes, but I didn’t want to do it. So I basically took a piece of thick plastic sprayed some contact adhesive on the back of it took my wife creative memory Christmas Tree stamp, hit it with a hammer punched out a Christmas tree out of hard plastic with adhesive on the back, stuck it over one of the schools and I said wow, that looks better than the injection molded one that didn’t really match very well. So for the next three months, I tried to figure out how I was going to make this product I had about two or three employees at the time, I said you got to do everything, you got to do the estimate, you got to do the installation, building everything I’m going to focus on trying to figure out how to make this product, I made the product. And today we have 800 products in the woodworking industry all over the world. And people love our products, because all of our ideas are lean ideas that come from our customers. So we don’t even know, we come up with ideas, but we don’t really need you. Because our customers know what the problem is just like the shop floor. People know what the problem is. So we listened to our customers, we pay them a 5% royalty, and the rest is history.

Patrick Adams  

Wow. That’s amazing. How important do you think it is for those that are listening in to listen to their customers? I mean, let’s talk a little bit about that. What are your thoughts around how important it is to really be tied in to what your customers’ needs are and really involve even involving your customers in the process of whatever it is that you’re doing?

Paul Akers  

Well, here’s what I’m going to say with a little interesting answer. Nobody’s ever really ever asked me that before, but I’m gonna give you a very strange answer. It’s not important at all. If you’re 98% of the companies out there that are satisfied with being good. It’s not important at all. You just keep doing what you’re doing. You’re the smart guy on the block, you have all the answers, your customers are not necessarily the smartest people, you’re the you’re the entrepreneur, you’re the owner, it’s not necessary at all. So it’s not necessary. I’m thinking in Spanish, but if you want operational excellence, if you want excellence, if you want extraordinary life and extraordinary experience as you travel through this light, it’s essential. I love that answer.

Patrick Adams  

I love that. And it’s simple. Right? It’s essential. I love it. So just going back to FastCap. Well, you know, one of the things actually, that I talked to a lot of my clients, when I mentioned your name is, you know, as a CEO, there’s a lot of President CEO, I mean, you’re obviously a very busy person. And one of the things that you do is you come into work early, you come into the office early, you’re out on the production floor, I believe you use WhatsApp, but you as a company, you’re out there asking your team members to show you what they fixed. You know, they’re fixing what bugs them out on the floor, and you want them to show you and you’re taking time to go do that. And you’re videoing it and then I believe you posted out on WhatsApp to the entire company. Why do you do that? What’s the motivation behind that as the president of FastCap?

Paul Akers  

Well, the first thing is a deep belief that people are smart, and that God made them with the capacity to solve problems. If as an owner, you know, you become very successful, we start making a lot of money, you start thinking you’re the brain trust in the world, and it’s just not the truth. The truth is that God made every human being with this capacity to think and solve problems. So I approach life through that filter. I don’t care who you are, I know you have capacity. So I allow my people to stop work at anytime they want and solve a problem, particularly one that bugs them one that irritates the hell out of them stop and on my dime, run some experiments take 15 minutes, a half hour, an hour, two hours, get two or three people together, play with some different ideas and see what happens and I don’t care if it fails. Because I know that if we do that consistently, the aggregation of the small two second improvements are going to create operational excellence for our company, for our team, and for our customers. There’s no more to it than that. And I just know that we’re back and I have proof of it. My company is outrageous. In every freaking regard. It’s outrageous. Like so outrageous. People wouldn’t people don’t believe me, when I tell and show them what we’re doing, it’s not done. See possible, it makes the companies on Wall Street look like a joke. By comparison. Wow. Because it’s all the aggregation of marginal gains, and people just don’t believe that, but I do believe it cuz I know, scientifically, it’s backed. And I also experienced it myself. So I know that it works,

Patrick Adams  

right. And for those that are, you know, listening in right now that maybe aren’t an executive in executive leadership at their company, or a CEO or a president of a company, and they feel like I just don’t have time for that, like, I don’t, I’m so busy. You know, with this and that, what would you say to someone that that’s listen,

Paul Akers  

I would say you’re part of the 98% of the world, knock yourself out, go keep doing what you’re doing. You’re like that 98%. This whole second lien thing is for 2% of the people of the world that people that are completely contrarians, they say, No, we’re going to stop work. We’re going to fix what bugs us and we’re going to do it. Now. We know there’s all these pressures, we know everybody wants everything, we’re going to fix it now. Because we know that in the near future, definitely in the future, but in the near future, our productivity is going to be significantly higher with less defects and our customers are going to be higher, happier. So we’re gonna stop now. And we’re gonna fix it now.

Patrick Adams  

Exactly.

Paul Akers

But most people don’t get that it’s not confusing to them. They don’t believe it.

Patrick Adams  

And it sounds simple, right, a two second improvement. And that’s your most recent book. Two. Secondly, and you talk about small, consistent improvements. And obviously, you’ve been able to prove it out at FastCap. But why do you think it is important to focus on those small consistent improvements?

Paul Akers  

Because it’s manageable. It’s not too overwhelming for the average person who doesn’t come at this with a deep understanding or deep knowledge. And we say to them, and this is how the whole story came about. I’ll tell you the story. It’s really interesting that they could just say, hey, you know, Patrick, just save, just save two seconds a day. I mean, that’s nothing I mean, that where you put your toothpaste, instead of putting it in the drawer, put it on the counter neatly arranged in a specific place. So you’d have to open the door and close the drawer every time twice a day to get it and to put it away, right? Just say two seconds. That’s all I want. The story is really interesting. I was in the injection molding department, NYCLU ca was working for me as a young kid, maybe 1819 years old, and I would do my improvement walk every morning, walk through the entire facility and help everybody with their improvements. I got to Nick’s department. I said, Nick, did you make an improvement? He said, No. And I said, is everything perfect in your department? He goes, Yeah, well, it’s pretty good. I said, You mean there’s nothing in here that bothers you, that irritates you? There’s no everything’s pretty good. Come on, Nick. There’s got to be something that bothers you. And he goes, Well, now I think about it. Whenever I change the mold on the machine, I have to get it level before I bolted to the platen. And I always had to put a level on top and kind of bend my head inside the machine and kind of look to see if the vials level. I said, okay, that bugs you. How can we fix that Nick? And he said, I don’t know. And I said, well look at it, what would it take for you to see that bio, and he goes, Well, I got to have some way to reflect it. So I’d have to put my head in there. A mirror, we had a mirror, we went and got a little plastic mirror for our PLP department point of purchase display. Got it, glued it on there with hot glue, put a popsicle stick to support it like a gusset. All of a sudden he puts a level on there. He’s not putting his head inside of the machine. You can see when the BIOS level or not he just the machine bolts it up goes wow. So Nick, that’s all I want. Save yourself the two seconds of putting the level on there and putting your head inside and bringing it out. That’s all I want. It was more comfortable for you. Great gave you greater happiness or Felicity, you walked up and approached that specific process. And it was much easier. That’s all I want. Nicky goes yeah, I can do that. Two seconds, baby. That’s it.

Patrick Adams  

Amazing. And obviously, you’ve been able to see the results of that at FastCap with developing a true culture of continuous improvement. Do you also have longer term projects that are happening improvement projects? Or, you know, 90 Day plans or anything like that? Or Or are you only focused on the small things that add up to large improvements?

Paul Akers  

Well, certainly we have some big monster prop projects that we have to undertake, whether it be rebuilding the injection molding department or working on inventory management systems that are commensurate with the sophistication of our company and the complexity of our company. We have projects like that that last for six months, but I’m gonna be honest with it. I’ll go back to the 98 and 2% 98% of everything we do. It’s a small improvement. Sure, we had the big ones but not not a lot of them. And to be honest with you because we don’t have the problems that most companies have? Because we’re so crazy about solving every problem as it comes to us. We don’t have these big monstrous issues that most people have, we have them occasionally, but not like other companies do.

Patrick Adams  

Sure, sure. What do you think it takes to be a good leader in an organization with a culture of continuous improvement? Are there any specific, you know, skills, skill sets? Or, you know, what does it take you?

Paul Akers  

And you’ve said that, I’ve never given this answer before, and you can cut it out if you want to be more appropriate. But you have to realize that you have your head up your ass. And the minute you realize, as a leader, that you have your head up your ass, you’re golden, you know. But if you approach everything like that, and you’re the smartest guy and nobody else has any answers, and you can’t shut your mouth and listen to somebody else, articulate a concept, it’s over with, you’re wasting your time. That’s a great thing. So the polite, so the polite answered when it cut that one out is you need to be humble, and you need to realize other people have good ideas, and you’re not the only brain trust in the world. Hmm,

Patrick Adams  

I love that. And I definitely will not be cutting that answer out. That’s a good answer. Okay, so I want to shift gears here a little bit, because I want to talk a little bit about your personal life because I do watch a lot of your videos like a lot of people do. I’m sure that you are listening, especially the ones that you record at your house or in your garage. Because you offer practical examples that anyone can understand. And I’m curious to hear you know, what, why do you do that? What’s the motivation behind your, your videos that you post that are outside of you know, the the corporate office or the manufacturing plant? Or whatever it might be?

Paul Akers  

Yeah, it’s a good question. And it’s probably the cornerstone of who I am as a human being. All I care about is helping people grow, I get so much satisfaction and joy in life when I see another human being go through the discovery process and understand they have infinite capacity. So by me sharing what I’m doing, some people might say, It’s corny, why are you wasting your time because I know they’re 1000s-10s of millions of people around the world who have been affected by these videos. We have millions and millions of people who have watched them. We have 10s of 1000s of companies globally who are doing two secondly, it’s everywhere. I say from the smallest village in Africa, $2 billion oil companies are doing this to Chick fil A, I mean, the list is endless. And so there’s so much joy in knowing that everyone’s life is better. I’ll tell you a great story that just happened to me. So I’m living in a beautiful complex here in Mexico. And I walk down the corridor to go to my room and the girl is mopping the floor. And they have trained her to wring out the mop by hand. And oh my gosh, it’s just so difficult. Right? And I have a Japanese spinning mop. You know what, it’s pretty much you put it in there and yeah, what you put your pump and it spins it all out. And it just does a perfect job. It cleans the mop and rings it out. You can mop really effectively about So, three days ago I started doing this and I went down there and in Spanish. I explained to her that you can use my mob. I’ll buy one for you if you want to stick to me. I don’t care about the Bible. I can’t see you work this hard. She said SR I would love to but I’m not allowed to. I have to only work with the equipment that they’ve given me. I have to do it the way they showed me. So today I’m walking down there. And her supervisor is there watching and I go okay, I could add Amiga when a momento por una una pregunta proper. I said, I have a question for you. I have this month I put it all together. I showed her movie may horror much easier movie fatsia much simpler. She looks at you guys. Please use it. You can have it. And she took it in. Wow. And they’re down there right now and we walk in love with it and they’re using it right now. This is what gets me jacked up. Yes. When everyone has a better life because of improvement.

Patrick Adams  

Hmm, that’s amazing. That was such a great story and exactly what we want to hear is what you know, that’s happening not just in the corporate world, but in everyday life. How Lean can be applied no matter what you’re doing. And that’s what I love about you know, watching your videos and listening to you talk and just knowing that you know lien is it’s a way of life and you’ve you’re passionate about that you stand behind that like no one else that I know and so I don’t want to say that. Yeah, wait for seven. Speaking of that TOS you know some people may not know this, but you are an instrument rated pilot and you’ve actually flown your personal plane I believe all around the world, different places around the world yourself.

Paul Akers  

I’ve been I’ve landed over 500 airports and had three North Atlantic crossings in a single engine airplane, you know, just really crazy insane stuff. Love it. For the most part, I’ve made some errors in my life. And I did some things I probably shouldn’t have done. But I’ve learned from Fortunately, I’m still alive to tell the story. But yeah, I’ve flown in the craziest conditions you could imagine landing in Iceland and Greenland and Stornoway, Scotland and Sardinia and a little island in the Mediterranean and lamina roam and oh, gosh, I could just go on and on.

Patrick Adams  

And one of the videos that I saw you were showing the instrument panel in your plane, and you were talking about Leader Standard Work and why that’s important. And it was funny, because just after I saw your video, I didn’t know it was a few months after, I found myself in Alaska, and I had the opportunity to fly with a bush pilot in a small plane. And we were on the runway getting ready to the short little runway that they take off in Alaska, which I was a little concerned about. But obviously he did an amazing job. So I’m still alive as well today. But literally before he even started the plane, he pulled out a physical laminated checklist. And he literally went through and checked it off on each item that he had to go through to make sure that we had everything in place. And we were ready before takeoff. And I just thought it humble. And he knew his stuff. I mean, he was actually one of the trainers at this particular mission. They’re training missionary pilots to go fly in inclement weather and you know, be able to take off and land on short runways. So this guy was a trainer. So he knew his stuff, but he still pulled out his checklist and went through it. And it just immediately made me think about your video. And you know, I wrote about it in my book as well, just how important it is that we as leaders have our own Leader Standard Work, you know, we’re not above a pilot, a trainer who knows his stuff. And he’s still using a checklist. What are your thoughts on that when it comes to?

Paul Akers  

Yes, you know, I look at my phone right now. And I go to my to- do list and I have a checklist for tennis. So every morning I play tennis for two hours. Do I have everything on there money basting, I’m allergic to be so I don’t have my beating. I could die if I get bee sting sunglasses, hat balls, and coffee water. Rack eyedrops off for mosquitoes. I go through my checklist every day, when I’m kitesurfing, I have a checklist. Are you kidding? I want to be successful. I don’t like defects. I don’t like reworking. I don’t want to be injured. I mean, and, and yet, you know what you said he was a very competent person using a trainer Well, I’m a trainer, I’m a pretty competent person to write. But I’m humble enough to know that we’re human, and we make mistakes and good processes protect you. So you can have a full life and not an abbreviated one because of your stupidity.

Patrick Adams  

That’s so true. And you know, a lot of a lot of companies out there they, they hope that they’re going to get the culture that they want they they wish that it will happen, you know, and in reality, if they if they know the behaviors that are going to give them a continuous improvement culture, why would they not want to make sure that those behaviors are happening not only for their their themselves, but for all the leaders in the organization. And that’s really the power of Leader Standard Work is making sure that you have the behaviors and the actions that are going to give you the results that you’re looking for?

Paul Akers  

Well, I think you asked a good question, why don’t they do that? Well, number one, you have to stop in order to do my little checklist for tennis, I had to stop, take five minutes, go through it. And every day, I have to stop and take 10 seconds and look at it. And some people don’t want that interruption to their creativity or to their flow in life. And they don’t understand that when they miss one of these the disruption is 10 times more than stopping to just quickly go through this every morning before I walk out the door. So true. It’s a lack. It’s both an intense ignorance on how the laws of nature work and what’s really going on in the universe. And it’s coupled with pride. It’s coupled with ego and I know better. I’m smart enough to manage this. Absolutely. That’s what I think I agree with.

Patrick Adams  

And that’s what I’ve seen as well for anyone that’s listening that’s maybe new to lean, you know, they’re maybe just starting their journey or this is the first time they’re hearing about Lean possibly. What advice would you give to a new person who’s just just starting their journey?

Paul Akers  

Let me think how I would frame that. What advice would I give to somebody lean and they’re gonna start their journey? They’re committed, they’re committed to starting the journey.

Patrick Adams  

Yeah, I think if they’re, if they’re listening to this podcast, they’re probably they’ve either been recommended or or maybe they just started their Lean journey. They, you know, understand the power, the benefits they’ve heard somebody told them about it, you know, the the results that they found applying lean, and so yeah, I would say they’re, they’re committed and they’re looking for What’s my, what’s my first step? Or what’s my next step?

Paul Akers  

Okay? Lean is simple. All we’re doing is eliminating the waste in the hundreds of processes that you’re doing every day, whether it be making your lunch, collecting information for someone cleaning your toilet, making an appointment to go to the dentist, I don’t care what it is, everything is a process. You say, I gotta call my doctor, what’s the process, you pull it up, you look for the phones or your things. all your contacts are kind of organized under doctor first so you can scroll through all your doctors. And then you call what is the process, there’s a process for everything you do. All we’re doing, and all you’re trying to do is take those processes and take away the waste, the wasted motion, the defects, the rework, the eight ways you’re trying to do that, and then realize that this is a lifelong journey. Nothing is ever perfect. It’s a giant game. And if you approach lean from the standpoint, that number one, it’s every day number two, it’s a game. Number three, Nothing’s ever perfect. Number four, everything can be improved continuously, you’re going to win, you’re going to win. But if you ignore any one of those points that I just made, you’re going to do.

Patrick Adams  

That’s right. And I also have seen people that feel like they need to spend, you know, hours weeks learning understanding before they take any step at all and older

Paul Akers  

debt. Balderdash. Yeah. Absolute nonsense. Start today, right now fix what bugs you, anything that bothers you, stop, spend 1015 minutes, run an experiment, see whether or not it works, try to improve it. Or it’s not about getting it perfect. It’s about learning. We’re creating a learning organization. When you do something that fails, you learn Henry Ford Edison, I could go right on down the list. All they did was run experiments all day long. Look at what they did. They changed the world.

Patrick Adams  

Exactly. And I love it. And I so much appreciate you taking the time to, to chat with, with myself and with the audience today. If anybody’s interested to grab your book two second lean, I believe they can just go read an Amazon search two second lean or or go right to I believe it’s on your website as well. Correct?

Paul Akers  

Yeah, it’s even easier than that, Patrick. I mean, yes, it’s available everywhere. It’s a 19 languages. Now. It’s insane. I think it’s printed in like nine languages. But here’s what you do, you can get if you buy five copies or more, they’re only like five bucks apiece from us. We sell them basically for cost ridiculous just in 15 $16 book, you can get it for five bucks apiece, we have companies by hundreds all the time. But you don’t need to spend a penny because I don’t want your money. I have an app, I just spent $50,000. Wow, it has all my books in nine languages. It’s better than audible. It’s better than a book than the app that Amazon produce. Just go to lean play two second lean play, go to the Google Store wherever download it for free. Click on the language you want to listen to it, whether it be Russian, Vietnamese, you know, Portuguese, Portuguese, Abel, they’re all They’re all there. And just start listening right now you have to spend a dime, and then you can pass it on to everyone. If you have a question. There’s a chat button, you can actually press a button and ask me a question live.

Patrick Adams  

Wow. I love that. That was one of the things that I appreciated when I listened to your book was that you gave your direct email, call me text or email me? You know, whatever. If you have a question or anything, I’ll help, you know, direct you to the right answer. So well, that’s amazing. Well, we’ll put a link to that app in the show notes so that if anybody’s listening and they would like to download that app, you can go right to the show notes and download it directly there. That’s amazing.

Paul Akers  

No problem. Yeah, we made it deliberately for the shop for people so that the average person had no excuse. I don’t have money. I don’t have anything. It’s all free. Just download it. Listen to your work.

Patrick Adams  

I love it. That’s great. Any closing words for the listeners, Paul on anything at all, obviously, the other thing that will drop into the the show notes is your web address to FastCap too because you guys have some amazing Lean tools that are available for purchase through the company there as well. So we’ll drop that in the show notes. But any closing remarks for anyone that’s listening, you know, any motivational words or any words of wisdom that you’d like to deliver to the audience?

Paul Akers  

Yeah, for those of you that are listening, that have the courage to stop doing it the way you’ve been doing it and embark on this new journey, get ready, because you’re about ready to have the most joyous fulfilled life you could ever imagine.

Patrick Adams  

I love it. So true as well. So true. Thank you, Paul, so much appreciate what you’re doing all around the world for the Lean community. And you know, for anyone out there that’s just looking to improve their lives, their personal lives, their work lives. I so much appreciate the work that you’re doing. And I really look up to you as an inspiration for myself and my own learning as well. So thank you so much for coming in.

Paul Akers

My pleasure. My pleasure, Patrick. Absolutely.

Patrick Adams  

All right. Take care, Paul. Okay. Bye bye. Thanks so much for tuning in to this episode of the lean solutions podcast. If you haven’t done so already, please be sure to subscribe. This way you’ll get updates as new episodes become available. If you feel so inclined. Please give us a review. Thank you so much.

Meet Patrick

Patrick is an internationally recognized leadership coach, consultant, and professional speaker, best known for his unique human approach to sound team-building practices; creating consensus and enabling empowerment. He founded his consulting practice in 2018 to work with leaders at all levels and organizations of all sizes to achieve higher levels of performance. He motivates, inspires, and drives the right results at all points in business processes.

Patrick has been delivering bottom-line results through specialized process improvement solutions for over 20 years. He’s worked with all types of businesses from private, non-profit, government, and manufacturing ranging from small business to billion-dollar corporations.

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